Grapes of Raft

A play on words becomes a play on shapes. Sometimes art starts with an image first, sometimes the words twist around until the physical form takes shape.

Inspired by a trip to Crested Butte, Colorado, this tiny tableau is titled, “Grapes of Raft.

Like a twisting, rolling, unpredictable river, the rapids in “Grapes of Raft” turned over and over in my mind until I knew there was a snow globe to be made. The rapids were sculpted first in clay, which was used to make a mold for clear resin with a hefty dose of iridescent shavings to catch the light. A tiny metal raft carried green glass grapes, inexplicably holding tinier brass paddles.

One of a kind snow globe (sparkle globe) with shimmering iridescent silver dust and glitter when shaken. Hand-painted acrylic base in shades of pewter, silver and gold, finished with two bunches of brass grapes and an engraved silver plate stating “Grapes of Raft.” The interior sculpture is cast clear resin with added iridescent flecks to increase the reflective properties under liquid, brass raft and green glass grapes holding tiny hammered brass raft paddles.

All designs and images are copyright (c) 2015, 2016 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.  This globe will be presented at the Crested Butte Arts Festival, Crested Butte, Colorado in August, 2016.

THINGS are looking up

Maybe the best part of this snowstorm design is that the title came long after the visual design.

And it was the kind of perfect you-gotta-love-it grin for me, lover of puns and multiple interpretations. A cliche turned on its ear.

I hadThings Are Looking Up custom snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2014 the idea of a person looking down a microscope, and wondered, “what would happen if you saw an eye looking back at you?”

The scale became grander, a two-tiered snow globe, with a tiny man peering into a downwards telescope.

Below, the rolling green mounds come into focus: Wait. There’s a bright crop of green eyes staring back.

Things Are Looking Up custom snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2014

And the “what if?”of the double snow globe became its own double meaning.

Because things ARE looking up.

Or if you prefer, THINGS are looking up.

“Things are Looking Up” — one of a kind, two-tiered snow globe (waterglobe), by Camryn Forrest Designs. All designs and images copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado.

Tell us what you think!

Believe

What we believe can be the elusive butterfly for which we reach. The unexpected beauty that flutters among us, teasing us with its promise. We hold out our hands and hold our breath, waiting and hoping the truth will touch us.

I close my eyes and wish for things I’ve never seen; I believe in things I’ve only dreamed.

With a whisper and a shake, this snow globe is bathed in a shimmering light. So close and so nearly out of reach; and nothing we can say or do will change what will happen next.

Ask yourself: do you believe?

Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Attraction (copper heart)

Attraction copper heart snow globe, Camryn Forrest DesignsAt the Cherry Creek Arts Festival earlier this month, a small child asked me “what is your favorite snow globe here today?” And the surprising answer was: Attraction.

Well, it was surprising to me at least, because I thought I’d love my tiny airships, the Jules Verne-like “Under the Sea” submarine and octopus, the visual puns, such as “Too Big for his Bridges.”

But Attraction had the sweetest, most perfect sense of longing, of the undeniable pull in a new direction. The curving copper wire reminds me of tall grass and winds on the Kansas prairie, bending everything towards one point.

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