Diving into a Sea Story

In so many endeavors, humans try to emulate other creatures and end up standing out … well, like an opposable thumb. We want to soar in the skies so we create vibrant colored hot air balloons. It’s a pretty cool experience, but hardly mimics a bird.

It occurs to me that there are a few activities we humans attempt, visiting someone else’s environment, that DO begin to emulate  the creatures who live there. When I started working on a scuba diver water globe I had a hard time making the diver clearly stand out from the landscape, the underwater plants, the coppery coral, the tentacles nearby. And without any change on my part the problem became the solution: it was exactly what I had experienced underwater, the feeling of moving like a fish, of the wetsuit color blending in like a dolphin, experiencing how the movement of the water shaped the way I responded.

I decided I liked the idea that the scuba diver was nearly indistinguishable from the other parts of the seascape.

We know that many swimming creatures, both mammals and fish, survive by camouflage. They either look like something else, or they try to blend in to the surroundings.
So this snow globe, errrrr, water globe, (sorry, just canNOT say “snow” to an underwater scene — when shaken, the softest whisper of sand swirls in the water), became a brain teaser of sorts. If I didn’t tell you what it depicted, would you guess? Would you see the “one of these things” that doesn’t quite belong?

Here’s the finished liquid-filled globe, and the last photo … you’ll see the diver was there all along, not hiding, just happily blending in with all the scenery.

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

And here’s the diver, highlighted from the colors of the sea.Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Believe

What we believe can be the elusive butterfly for which we reach. The unexpected beauty that flutters among us, teasing us with its promise. We hold out our hands and hold our breath, waiting and hoping the truth will touch us.

I close my eyes and wish for things I’ve never seen; I believe in things I’ve only dreamed.

With a whisper and a shake, this snow globe is bathed in a shimmering light. So close and so nearly out of reach; and nothing we can say or do will change what will happen next.

Ask yourself: do you believe?

Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Attraction (copper heart)

Attraction copper heart snow globe, Camryn Forrest DesignsAt the Cherry Creek Arts Festival earlier this month, a small child asked me “what is your favorite snow globe here today?” And the surprising answer was: Attraction.

Well, it was surprising to me at least, because I thought I’d love my tiny airships, the Jules Verne-like “Under the Sea” submarine and octopus, the visual puns, such as “Too Big for his Bridges.”

But Attraction had the sweetest, most perfect sense of longing, of the undeniable pull in a new direction. The curving copper wire reminds me of tall grass and winds on the Kansas prairie, bending everything towards one point.

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It’s Complicated — Heart – Stacked Snow Globe

Now and then we get  take a fresh look at how to make snow globes —

It's Complicated Heart Snow Globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Last year it was the elaborate snow globe for the Sacramento Steampunk Society; this go around, it’s a double-decker snow globe with an open base, entitled “It’s Complicated.”

The tricky part of a double, open snow globe base isn’t making it, it is designing the open part so it can be touched. Because we have to believe that all snow globe are made to be picked up, touched and shaken. Unlike the interiors in snow globes, which are cradled by the surrounding liquid, that the open part of a double-decker snow globe will be touchable. Sure, folks are fairly careful with “art” but it’s out there in the elements and needs to be secure enough to withstand a poke, a prod, and a wiggle when the entire piece is upended and shaken.

“It’s Complicated” includes a black and silver glass heart with a few mechanical parts above, bathed in silver and black metallic glitter, with a push-me, pull-me sculpture on chain and springs below. Sometimes the love we show is “oh so pretty!” and the complicated feelings are below the surface. But in this case, you can see it all laid bare.

It's Complicated Heart Snow Globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 It's Complicated Heart Snow Globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 It's Complicated Heart Snow Globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013It's Complicated Heart Snow Globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

“It’s Complicated” will be shown at the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, July 5-6-7 in Denver, Colorado.  Stop by our booth and give it a shake.

Beaded Metaphor: Seeking Closure

Inspiration comes from anyplace.

A new friend invited me to attend a bead show with her a month or so ago, and I went, mainly because I’d never been before. We wandered aisles and admired antique and vintage beads, carved beads, melted beads, beads from other countries, beads that were brightly colored, and those as dull as river pebbles.

Seeking Closure Snow Globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

But as we wandered, I found myself clutching new little bags from this booth, and that one next, glittering little pockets of ideas that were taking shape. A shape or color would catch my eye, and I would buy just a handful, or a single bead, here and there.

One particular type of bead I’d never seen before. Tiny squares with a metallic finish, suggesting tarnish and rust and rich with patinas. Touches of raspberry and aqua and blue against bronze and pewter tones. So lovely, I wanted to rub handfuls together and hear sound they’d make.

I bought them of course, and when I got home, I wove the double-holed beads into a partial wall like tiny flat bricks, intentionally missing a piece here and there. The wall, just two inches tall, took on the look of rubble, or the last piece standing after some ominous disaster. But even missing pieces, even tattered and torn, the shapes and subtle color emanated beauty. The piece is a metaphor and a sculpture, not a true-to-life miniature scene.

The snow globe was completed with a rich and sooty dust, and a beaded detail on the wood base.

 

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Seeking Closure: one of a kind snow globe sculpture with metallic beads, liquid and iridescent dust.