Untangling “The Tangle”

We’re excited to have one of our liquid globes featured in the upcoming independent movie, “The Tangle” by writer/director/actor Christopher Soren Kelly.

And while we are being patient for the movie release, and getting ready for the next three art festivals on our calendar, here’s an interview about Kelly’s body of work which includes more information on “The Tangle.”  Enjoy!

INK, The Frame, and Christopher Soren Kelly

  • Apex Magazine, August 2016

Look for the movie trailer to appear in the spring of 2017. Meanwhile, here’s a tease of the snow globe used in the movie:

Cleo/Chill snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver CO 2016

Cleo/Chill custom snow globe, with sculpted clay head and glass bead/crystal mixed media embellishment by Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver CO USA 2016. All images and designs are copyright (c) 2016 Cleo/Chill snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver CO USA 2016.

Black Sails

Have you ever heard the saying, “that ship has sailed?”
I planned to take a series of fabulous photos of our newest airship snow globe when we got back to Colorado after showing at the spring One of a Kind show in Chicago, but …

that ship has sailed. It was purchased and is off on a new adventure, somewhere in Illinois.

Here are a few snaps we took during the making of “Black Sails” that may inspire us to make another someday.

 

“Black Sails” – one of a kind glitter snow globe, with tiny airship over a sailing ship with sails made of black cloth. When shaken the globe glitters with darker glitter, reminiscent of thunder and lightning. Hand-painted base with metallic patina effect and brass rivets. Design and images are copyright (c) 2016 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Men At Work

Machines both fascinate and frighten me. Sometimes their impact seems to overwhelm the presence of the very people who created them.
This sparkle snow globe, Men at Work, illustrates that feeling. Just who is in charge, anyway? what are we trying to accomplish?

Men at Work custom snow globe by Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado

When shaken, the scene is bathed in shimmering gold dust … until the dust settles, and the work begins again.

One of a kind snow globe/sparkle water globe with interior assembled sculpture of tiny men, gears, machines and tools. All images and designs copyright (c) 2015 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado.

It’s About Time

Think about it, if we could understand time, we’d understand most of the mysteries of the universe.

“Time is an illusion.”
― Albert Einstein

Its_About_Time snowglobe CamrynForrestDesigns, Denver, Colorado

It’s about time.  It’s ALWAYS about time.

  • Time is money.
  • Time waits for no man.
  • Like winter snow on summer lawn, time past is time gone …

     

    “There’s never enough time to do all the nothing you want.”
    ― Bill Watterson

     

I often say, it’s a good thing there are deadlines, because without the last minute, nothing would get done around here. But we never know if we have years left, or minutes, or merely seconds. We tell ourselves that time is precious, one shouldn’t waste time, that there is no time like the present.

Because, just like shaking a snow globe and watching the shiny numbers flitter, dance and sink again, time is fleeting. We have to make the most of what time we have; we have to dream, we have to be kind, we have to remember to laugh.

“One day spent with someone you love can change everything.”
― Mitch Albom

 

 

 “How did it get so late so soon?”
― Dr. Seuss

A four-sided grandfather clock, with time-related embellishments and detail, inside a snow globe. When shaken, the liquid-filled globe dances with gold glitter and silver numerals, representing the minutes and hours of time. One of a kind snow globe (snowstorm, waterglobe).  All designs and images copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.

 

“It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important.”
― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

Deep Thoughts, or “where’d I put that idea?” snow globe

Deep Thoughts snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USAI like the idea of Deep Thoughts, so ominous and important. Sitting around solving problems, contemplating the universe, or perhaps, just remembering to pick up milk on the way home.

Sometimes there’s a “deep thought” nibbling at the surface of my mind, something I can’t quite wrap around, something I can’t recall or can’t formulate. And thinking about thinking, which is what it amounts to, led to thinking about sending a crew to go get those important things I want to deliberate, or cogitate. (Is it just me, or do a lot of verbs about thinking sound like they could be parts of a washing machine cycle?)

Wouldn’t it be great if you could hire a cleaning crew to get rid of some embarrassing moment you want to forget, or a hazmat crew to sanitize your darkest secrets, or a cheerful group of elves to climb into recent memories and retrieve the happy ending to the dream you couldn’t quite recollect when your eyes opened?

Dig in, there are plenty of deep thoughts to go around.

 

 

“Deep Thoughts” one of a kind snow globe/waterglobe with sculptured miniature clay head and tiny workers digging deep into one’s mind. All designs and images are copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Remnants of Tesla

Nobody really knows what Nikola Tesla would have been capable of, if he’d somehow had the unlimited resources and scientific support needed to research, test and implement all the off-the-wall ideas bouncing around in his mind. As it is, we only have glimpses of his potential, and the ability to imagine what might have been.

Remnants_of_Tesla snowglobe CamrynForrestDesigns_2014
One of his most visible projects was the tower at Wardenclyffe, located on Long Island, New York, and reported to be the first step toward wireless broadcasting. The tower, under construction in the early 1900s and finished in about 1907, was dismantled in 1917.

Was Tesla ahead of his time? This is how he described his plans for the tower, which was reported to have a 55-ton dome (187 feet tall) made of conductive metals, and “roots” that penetrated nearly 200 feet into the Earth:

“As soon as [the Wardenclyffe facility is] completed, it will be possible for a business man in New York to dictate instructions, and have them instantly appear in type at his office in London or elsewhere. He will be able to call up, from his desk, and talk to any telephone subscriber on the globe, without any change whatever in the existing equipment. An inexpensive instrument, not bigger than a watch, will enable its bearer to hear anywhere, on sea or land, music or song, the speech of a political leader, the address of an eminent man of science, or the sermon of an eloquent clergyman, delivered in some other place, however distant. In the same manner any picture, character, drawing, or print can be transferred from one to another place …” (from “The Future of the Wireless Art,” Wireless Telegraphy and Telephony, 1908.)


It is said that Tesla held initial tests of the Tower in 1903, but just days after these tests, his dream was destroyed when creditors from Westinghouse confiscated his heavier equipment for nonpayment for services rendered. In 1917, the 187-foot tower was destroyed by dynamite explosion as ordered by the U.S. government.

Although often described as a telecommunications tower for wireless transmissions, some researchers and historians claim that there was another, much bigger, plan. “The Wardenclyffe plant was not to be solely used for the transmission of signals across the Atlantic, but more ambitiously, the transmission of electric power to any point on the globe without wires—a dream that Tesla had been constantly working toward for the past ten years. With his tower, he would “wobble” the Earth’s static charge. A successful test of his thesis would indeed be the crowning achievement of the age.”  ( from Wardenclyffe – a forfeited dream by Leland Anderson, 1968.)

Thanks to the help of the website “The Oatmeal” and a kickstarter campaign, building a museum dedicated to Tesla’s work is underway on the site of Tesla’s research laboratory and the original foundation of the tower. While it’s hoped that a replica of the tower will be created, we may not ever know how it was intended to operate, as much of Tesla’s brilliance was kept alive in his own memory and thought processes, and rarely written down.

What we have is an incomplete idea of Tesla’s potential and only a partial understanding of his contributions.

What we really have is, Remnants of Tesla.

 

Remnants of Tesla, one of a kind snow globe sculpture, miniature tower created from repurposed vintage jewelry. When shaken, slivers of bright silver flecks give the appearance of liquid electricity and wireless energy. All images and design copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado.

Notes:

In August 2012, in collaboration with internet cartoonist Matt Inman (TheOatmeal.com), The Tesla Science Center at Wardenclyffe (TSC) group launched an internet fundraising campaign that ultimately raised $1.37 million and eventually succeeded in purchasing the 16-acre industrial property, including Wardenclyffe and the original tower base.

For more information on the progress of the Tesla Science Center at Wardenclyffe, read this.