All She Ever Thinks About

Jimi Hendrix’s lyrics for “Little Wing” inspired this globe. Because,

…. Butterflies and zebras, and moonbeams, that’s all she ever thinks about.


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“Little Wing” by Jimi Hendrix

Well she’s walking, through the clouds

With a circus mind that’s running round

Butterflies and zebras

And moonbeams

And-a, fairytales

That’s all she ever thinks about

Riding with the wind

When I’m sad, she comes to me

With a thousand smiles she gives to me free

It’s alright, she said, it’s alright

Take anything you want from me

Anything, anything

Fly on, little wing.

“All She Ever Thinks About” original clay sculpted head and shoulders with metallic flower garland and hovering butterflies. When shaken, the liquid filled glass globe fills with dancing butterflies, moonbeams and slivers of silver moon. Images and designs are copyright (c) 2020 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.
Lyrics for “Little Wing” are copyright (c) 1967 by the Jimi Hendrix Experience.

Head Start

“The journey of a 100 miles begins with a single step.”

Where does everything start? With a thought, an idea, an urge, a feeling. It starts in your head. Sometimes your inspiration comes fully formed, ready to go, one size fits. And other times it needs to get loose, run around, find a rhythm to get going.

When we have an advantage, we call it a “head start.” Funny thing, that, since everything starts and finishes in the head. Don’t quit while you’re ahead: keep running until you get there. Where ever “there” may be.

details head start

“Head Start” original snow (sparkle) globe. All images and designs copyright (c) 2019, 2020 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.

clay head start

Heart of the Redwoods

redwood walk sideHow long does a Redwood tree live?
There are some majestic trees in Muir Woods believed to be more than 700 years old. Their cousins are even older: the oldest coastal redwood is more than 2,500 years old and the oldest giant sequoia is about 3,200 years old.

It doesn’t take much to imagine how it felt to walk into the heart of the redwoods a century ago, or to walk there now; towering trees surround you in a majestic sort of cathedral. Whether you stroll quietly along a path as pine needles muffle your steps, or eat lunch in the shade, or simply enjoy the dappled sunshine streaking here and there between the trunks and branches, know this: Those redwoods are likely to be here long after we are gone.

Since a real redwood would be far too large for a snow globe, these tiny trees are first carved, then molded, then cast into shapes that will hold up in liquid. Will these faux redwoods last a thousand years? We don’t know, but if you are still around then, drop us a line and tell us.
The snow globe/water globe: A tiny dapper couple strolls sweetly  between the towering trees, perhaps a  hundred years ago, but only a moment in time for a tree that may live another thousand years. If trees could blink, they might not even notice the intrusion.
When shaken, the globe glitters with the subtle effect of dappled sunshine through a canopy of branches; wood base with tree-trunk embellishment.
One of a kind snow globe, all images and designs are copyright (c) Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.

 

 

A Construction of Cranes

You’ve heard of a Murder of Crows, or perhaps that a group of tropical pink birds is a Flamboyance of Flamingos. There’s a gaggle of geese and a gallery of gulls.
But did you know that a group of cranes may be called a Construction?
Now you do.

And with as many man-made cranes on the horizon these days, it’s nice to know that construction has another meaning, as well.

One of a kind snow globe/water globe with construction crane and miniature cranes (birds) suspended below. When shaken, the liquid-filled glass shimmers with gold dust.

Handpainted wood base with scaffolding detail and engraved plate.
All images and designes are copyright (c) 2019 Camryn  Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.

The Mother Ship

Who is running the ship, you ask?
It’s easy to figure this one out; the one who is balancing a babe on one hip, while sweeping the floor, keeping score in a ballgame, keeping a watchful eye on a youngster swinging with abandon, stirring the pot of dinner stew and running a tight ship, all at once.
Behold: The Mother Ship!

One of a kind snow/sparkle globe with airship and tiny figures hovering above the rooftops of a city, past or future. When shaken, the globe swirls with iridescent glitter dust, wrapping the scene in sparkling fog effects. Handpainted wooden base with brass embellishments and etched plate. All designs and photos are copyright (c) 2019 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado U.S.A.

Local News and the Snow Globe

We’ve been on the road a bit, and busy with family things, and in the studio working on new art for upcoming shows … and this blog has been a bit neglected.
To tide you over until the next time there’s a snow globe ready for its close-up, here’s a wonderful story from one of our local newspapers, “Life on Capitol Hill” in Denver.
Read all about it here.

 

Hilltop couple makes snow globes into works of art

The pair travels the country for art shows

Posted

Snow falls outside the window of Hilltop residents Cameron Lewis and Reid Grossnickle’s workshop. But there’s a bit of snow inside, too, in the confetti and glitter swirling in the collection of snow globes — some now decades old with yellowing water — that line shelves in the entrance of the pair’s packed workshop.

Many of the globes celebrated milestones of corporate companies, some no longer in existence.

Making snow globes was a career that unexpectedly landed in Grossnickle’s lap. He and Lewis originally made cubes with liquid and sculptures inside. The pair were at an art show in Las Vegas in the ‘90s when someone asked if the art could be set in globes instead.

So Grossnickle began making snow globes for companies. Lewis later explored the couple’s more artistic side with globes for art shows as well as their Etsy shop.

“I kept looking for snow globes that I imagined, and I couldn’t find any,” Lewis said. “There was nobody we could find making snow globes for grownup art.”

Cameron Lewis, left, and Reid Grossnickle stand in their workshop holding a few of
their snow globes. They create handmade works of art, with Lewis putting
together the pieces and Grossnickle creating the “snow” inside.
PHOTOS BY Kailyn Lamb

The magic happens at the back of the couple’s workshop in northeast Denver.

Grossnickle helps repair snow globes sent to the workshop, many of them collectibles or items with special family memories. But he also makes snow globes with people’s photos and for companies or universities that want bulk orders with each one looking exactly the same.

He is one of the few snow-globe makers in the U.S. making corporate products, Grossnickle said. Other companies are based in China and Taiwan. The pair don’t advertise or promote repairs on their website, but if people ask, Grossnickle will often take in customer’s broken globes. After repairing his first globe for a family who lost their mother to cancer, he couldn’t say no.

“When I fixed the one, Pandora’s Box got open, and the flood has just come in,” he said.

Lewis is in charge of the handmade creations — snow globes large and small inspired by trinkets or other objects she finds. She often stops on walks, picking up plastic pieces or items people consider trash.

“We still get inspired by what we experience,” she said.

Each globe contains its own little world. As a former architect, Grossnickle sometimes makes model stairs or other items to go in the globes. The largest ones are 5 inches in diameter. Often, Lewis sets those globes on stands that have vertical liquid tubes with glitter and confetti.

“Those are really fun because we’re pushing the envelope, how far can you push a snow globe,” Lewis said. “Either people get that or they don’t.”

The couple moved their workshop to northeast Denver after getting priced out of the River North neighborhood, where they worked for 30 years, they said. The workshop houses all the glitter and confetti for the globes, as well as the liquid solutions and glass. Creating snow globes can be as much a science as an art because of all the steps to ensure the confetti works in the liquid solution, Lewis said.

“Every glitter and confetti that we use has to be soaked for months,” Lewis said. “Otherwise, we dye all the liquid multi-colors.”

Although Lewis handles the business side of the artistic snow globes, making them is a collaborative effort. Once she finishes the sculpture on the inside, she passes it along to Grossnickle who picks out the color of the confetti. Some items float differently in the liquid, she added, and can take hours to descend to the bottom again.

Cameron Lewis gently shakes one of the finished snow globes. She said that she and Reid spend months testing the glitter inside the snow globes to make
sure they work well in the liquid solution.
PHOTO by Kailyn Lamb

“Reid’s brilliant with the confetti and sparkles, and how to add things,” Lewis said. “Occasionally, he’ll do something where you shake it and the globe will go completely solid color.”

Completing a snow globe can take several months of careful and concentrated work.

“Snow globes, you gotta treat them like babies,” Lewis said. “They’re divas.”

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