Too Big for his Bridges – snow globe

There once was a man too big for his bridges … Yes, yes, I know that’s not how the story goes, but it’s how this one is told.

Too Big for His Bridges, one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

When I first heard this phrase — or thought I’d mis-heard it, actually — I stopped the teller and said, “don’t you mean, too big for his britches?

And the storyteller looked at me sadly as one does with an ignorant guest and said firmly “bridges.”

I persisted, of course. “It’s britches, like pants, you know? He was too big for his pants. He got so big, he couldn’t get his britches on right.”

A sigh and a sad little smile were directed toward me with barely contained exasperation, “No, it’s bridges. When you are too big for your bridges, you start thinking yourself superior to everybody and you lose your bridges: your connections. You have no friends, no family, no relationships all because you are too big for your bridges. You can’t get from here to there without bridges, and bridges are all the people who can help you when there’s a challenge ahead.”

Well, I’m here to tell you, that started to make sense. And just because I heard a phrase one way up until this conversation, and then heard it another way for the first time, I suppose it doesn’t automatically make me right.

But it did make an interesting little waterball sculpture.

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“Too Big for His Bridges” one of a kind snow globe/waterglobe, (c) Camryn Forrest Designs, 2013

Waiting for Instructions (Don’t Wait!)

Guilty.

Sometimes I just sit around waiting for someone to tell me what to do. Waiting for a deadline to approach, or for the next big thing to hover over me like Godzilla before I’m forced to jump into action.

Worse, I see people who appear to be waiting their whole lives for a sign. Going through the motions, exerting the least effort possible to get by.

I don’t want to just “get by.” This is our opportunity to seize the moment, relish the experience, taste the chocolate, breathe deeply and live.

Hey, you out there waiting for instructions: it’s time to SHAKE THINGS UP!ย  Make something happen. Don’t be a bystander in your own story. Take a chance, make a change.

Or as my brother said once, Life. Be there.

Waiting for Instructions custom snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Waiting for Instructions custom snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Waiting for Instructions custom snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013ย  Waiting for Instructions custom snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Waiting for Instructions custom snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

“Waiting for Instructions”, one of a kind snow globe, mixed media with metal, repurposed items, chain and bead work. (c) 2013 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado

Diving into a Sea Story

In so many endeavors, humans try to emulate other creatures and end up standing out … well, like an opposable thumb. We want to soar in the skies so we create vibrant colored hot air balloons. It’s a pretty cool experience, but hardly mimics a bird.

It occurs to me that there are a few activities we humans attempt, visiting someone else’s environment, that DO begin to emulateย  the creatures who live there. When I started working on a scuba diver water globe I had a hard time making the diver clearly stand out from the landscape, the underwater plants, the coppery coral, the tentacles nearby. And without any change on my part the problem became the solution: it was exactly what I had experienced underwater, the feeling of moving like a fish, of the wetsuit color blending in like a dolphin, experiencing how the movement of the water shaped the way I responded.

I decided I liked the idea that the scuba diver was nearly indistinguishable from the other parts of the seascape.

We know that many swimming creatures, both mammals and fish, survive by camouflage. They either look like something else, or they try to blend in to the surroundings.
So this snow globe, errrrr, water globe, (sorry, just canNOT say “snow” to an underwater scene — when shaken, the softest whisper of sand swirls in the water), became a brain teaser of sorts. If I didn’t tell you what it depicted, would you guess? Would you see the “one of these things” that doesn’t quite belong?

Here’s the finished liquid-filled globe, and the last photo … you’ll see the diver was there all along, not hiding, just happily blending in with all the scenery.

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

And here’s the diver, highlighted from the colors of the sea.Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Diver Waterglobe by Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Believe

What we believe can be the elusive butterfly for which we reach. The unexpected beauty that flutters among us, teasing us with its promise. We hold out our hands and hold our breath, waiting and hoping the truth will touch us.

I close my eyes and wish for things I’ve never seen; I believe in things I’ve only dreamed.

With a whisper and a shake, this snow globe is bathed in a shimmering light. So close and so nearly out of reach; and nothing we can say or do will change what will happen next.

Ask yourself: do you believe?

Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013 Believe - one of a kind snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2013

Proto-Droid โ€“ the robot of parts unknown

I like this little guy. He’s a droid of sorts, a robot made of leftover parts. Maybe a prototype: still figuring out where everything goes.

Weren’t the first real robots much the same: a little bit of this, and cut that shorter, file that off over there, and weld this to that … and there you have it.

Function, not form: he’s less concerned with movie-star looks than what he can do.

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Shake his snow globe and his world is electric with a shower of sparkling gold possibilities.