Evergreen Holiday Walk December 5th

main street art gallery  Stop in to Main Street Fine Art Gallery (Evergreen, Colorado) for a wonderful display of original art from more than a dozen talented artists. It’s a unique, juried, co-op with high standards of artwork and presentation. Main Street Fine Art Gallery is run by the Evergreen Artists Association, www.EvergreenArtists.org.

This year, Camryn Forrest Designs is honored to show a selection of one of a kind snow globes at the gallery for the month of December.

Fancy a leisurely stroll in downtown Evergreen?
The 23rd Annual Holiday Walk, Mainstreet Downtown Evergreen (Colorado), takes place on Friday, Dec. 5, beginning at 5 p.m.

Here’s a taste of pieces which will be at the Gallery:

 

All images and designs copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado

Remnants of Tesla

Nobody really knows what Nikola Tesla would have been capable of, if he’d somehow had the unlimited resources and scientific support needed to research, test and implement all the off-the-wall ideas bouncing around in his mind. As it is, we only have glimpses of his potential, and the ability to imagine what might have been.

Remnants_of_Tesla snowglobe CamrynForrestDesigns_2014
One of his most visible projects was the tower at Wardenclyffe, located on Long Island, New York, and reported to be the first step toward wireless broadcasting. The tower, under construction in the early 1900s and finished in about 1907, was dismantled in 1917.

Was Tesla ahead of his time? This is how he described his plans for the tower, which was reported to have a 55-ton dome (187 feet tall) made of conductive metals, and “roots” that penetrated nearly 200 feet into the Earth:

“As soon as [the Wardenclyffe facility is] completed, it will be possible for a business man in New York to dictate instructions, and have them instantly appear in type at his office in London or elsewhere. He will be able to call up, from his desk, and talk to any telephone subscriber on the globe, without any change whatever in the existing equipment. An inexpensive instrument, not bigger than a watch, will enable its bearer to hear anywhere, on sea or land, music or song, the speech of a political leader, the address of an eminent man of science, or the sermon of an eloquent clergyman, delivered in some other place, however distant. In the same manner any picture, character, drawing, or print can be transferred from one to another place …” (from “The Future of the Wireless Art,” Wireless Telegraphy and Telephony, 1908.)


It is said that Tesla held initial tests of the Tower in 1903, but just days after these tests, his dream was destroyed when creditors from Westinghouse confiscated his heavier equipment for nonpayment for services rendered. In 1917, the 187-foot tower was destroyed by dynamite explosion as ordered by the U.S. government.

Although often described as a telecommunications tower for wireless transmissions, some researchers and historians claim that there was another, much bigger, plan. “The Wardenclyffe plant was not to be solely used for the transmission of signals across the Atlantic, but more ambitiously, the transmission of electric power to any point on the globe without wires—a dream that Tesla had been constantly working toward for the past ten years. With his tower, he would “wobble” the Earth’s static charge. A successful test of his thesis would indeed be the crowning achievement of the age.”  ( from Wardenclyffe – a forfeited dream by Leland Anderson, 1968.)

Thanks to the help of the website “The Oatmeal” and a kickstarter campaign, building a museum dedicated to Tesla’s work is underway on the site of Tesla’s research laboratory and the original foundation of the tower. While it’s hoped that a replica of the tower will be created, we may not ever know how it was intended to operate, as much of Tesla’s brilliance was kept alive in his own memory and thought processes, and rarely written down.

What we have is an incomplete idea of Tesla’s potential and only a partial understanding of his contributions.

What we really have is, Remnants of Tesla.

 

Remnants of Tesla, one of a kind snow globe sculpture, miniature tower created from repurposed vintage jewelry. When shaken, slivers of bright silver flecks give the appearance of liquid electricity and wireless energy. All images and design copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado.

Notes:

In August 2012, in collaboration with internet cartoonist Matt Inman (TheOatmeal.com), The Tesla Science Center at Wardenclyffe (TSC) group launched an internet fundraising campaign that ultimately raised $1.37 million and eventually succeeded in purchasing the 16-acre industrial property, including Wardenclyffe and the original tower base.

For more information on the progress of the Tesla Science Center at Wardenclyffe, read this.

 

A Kaleidescope of Butterflies

Did you know that a group of butterflies may be properly called a kaleidescope? Such a pretty and fitting description of the flashing colors and fleeting glimpses. Just like in real life, with real butterflies, if you blink — they’re gone!

kaleidescope_butterflies front

In this custom snow globe, a single metal butterfly rests delicately on a flower petal of repurposed bronze and copper. But shake the globe — if you are keen of eye — and you may see a kaleidescope of butterflies rain all around for a moment, then vanish again.

Kaleidescepe of Butterflies snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado

Kaleidescope of Butterflies, one of a kind snow globe using repurposed vintage jewelry, toys and watch parts. All designs and images copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado.

Dancing Disco Baby

Don’t raise your eyebrows at me in mock surprise! I was just as shocked as you were to see this “blast from the past” Disco Baby take shape. The pieces kept appearing mysteriously on the workbench. “Come on,” the voices chided. “Break all the rules. You can do it.”

It started with half an ornament that reminded me of a disco ball, and that reminded me of the early animation of Dancing Baby. Remember this little guy?  Oogachaka …

Well, here’s our take on it: Disco Baby. Complete with a bedazzled rhinestone base. Ooh, la la!
Disco Baby custom snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver CO

If the slide gallery will cooperate, you can almost imagine he’s dancing the night away.

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One of a Kind “Disco Baby” custom snow globe/water globe with acrylic jeweled base, and reflective silver and iridescent disco dots in liquid. All designs and images copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Renegade Airship

Arrrr, it’s the pirate’s life for me!

When one is in the mood to be dastardly, not just any ship will do. The Renegade is just that: a lone wolf gone off to seek fortune and adventure where it might be found.

 

When shaken, the ship disappears into the clouds. Renegade Airship snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado

 

Mixed media sculpture, 2.75 inches tall and about 3 inches wide, inside a glass globe filled with liquid and shimmering cloud dust. Leather-warpped base with brass rivet embellishment. All images and designs copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado

I Climb the Walrus (Koo Koo Ka Choo)

Don’t ask me to explain it, if you haven’t heard of “Alternative Lyric Syndrome” … well, that’s because I just made it up.

You hear a song you’ve heard before and Ba-Zing, you hear it differently this time.

Which is why my tired brain suggested that John was really saying “I climb the walrus.”  This really was  a delightful image to contemplate.

Doesn’t it look like fun?

 

 

 

 

“I Climb the Walrus” – Mixed Media 3-D sculpture inside a snow globe, one of a kind. All images, photographs and designs are copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.