To Hell and Back

For many people, the next road trip is only an excuse to secure another snow globe for the ever-expanding collection.

Prompted by the fascinating request to “Go to hell, and bring me back a snow globe,” we did just that.

A snow globe holding a hand, holding a snow globe which is holding a hand. It’s like M.C. Escher and Stephen King joined forces on the set of the Matrix. Okay, that’s a stretch, but a tiny real snow globe in the hand inside a small snow globe in another hand, inside a snow globe in YOUR hand … see what we did there?¬† Snow globe times infinity.

 

Custom snow globe with rich red, gold and black glitter, custom sculpted hand holding tiny glass snow globe with iridescent white sparkles and “snow” bits. Charred wood base.
All photographs and designs copyright (c) Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.

 

Family Reunion – Time Flies

Many of us have two types of family reunions: the one that exists only in the imagination, where everyone is relaxed and sits around enjoying homemade meals (with nary a dish to be washed, and nobody flitting about the kitchen and missing conversations); and the other type, where folks are coming and going and rushing around and making/breaking plans with lots of “be back soon” and “we should catch up sometime” commentary as the minutes and days whiz by.

Sometimes, despite the desire for the union of the reunion, people just seem to be moving in opposite directions, even living on different planes of reality, as it were. Families are fluid by nature; they don’t sit still for long.

And so, with a nod to the imagination of M.C. Escher, Family Reunion.

 

 

One of a kind snow (sparkle) globe with hand-fabricated staircase and vintage figures scurrying about. When shaken, the liquid-filled globe shimmers with gold dust, only slightly prettier than we imagine the sands of time. Images and design copyright (c) 2016 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado  USA.

Point of View (snowglobe)

Point of View¬† is a one of a kind custom snow globe with a nod to the drawings of M.C. Escher — only it’s in 3-D.

While Escher used carefully drawn angles and tricks with perspective to create impossible structures in which people marched endlessly — defying gravity — in a snow globe, I realized an artist has no limitations imposed by the laws of physics. The impossible becomes reality. When you make art, you can make your own rules.

On a tiny custom staircase, determined human figures march upward, downward, sideways and in their own plane and space; if you turn the globe upside down, or on its side, you’ll see the tiny world from a different “Point of View.” One lone gentleman sits atop his staircase, perhaps pondering which way to go.

The one-of-a-kind snow globe is finished with an engraved plate (black over brass) and the title, affixed to the black base. When shaken, a light shimmer of gold dust changes the scene, and settles again, outlining the planes and edges of each stair.

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