Long and Winding Road

Life’s like that: a series of twists and turns where you end up in an unexpected place.

Maybe it makes you laugh, maybe you feel frightened by what you cannot predict. Sometimes life takes you to a place you’ve never been before that feels like it’s home. Or perhaps you wander into a dead-end alley and have to figure out a new path, retracing steps and wondering “how did I get here?”

Like the bestLong Winding Road custom snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2015 short stories, and maybe the best novels and best lives, often the journey has a long and winding road, one where you can’t see the beginning and the end along the way, but one that takes you exactly where you need to be. Or when you finally reach that spot that feels like home and you wonder: what took me so long to find this place? Not knowing … ah, keeps it interesting that way.

Or as the wise philosopher Buckaroo Bonzai said, “where ever you go, that’s where you’ll be.”

 

 

 

 

“Long Winding Road” one of a kind custom snow globe, with clay stone steps, vintage toys and jewelry findings in a liquid-filled glass globe. When shaken, the liquid swirls with hopes and dreams, love and loss, and a few sparkles and iridescent hearts. All designs and images copyright (c) 2015 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.

WISH, a simple snow globe

Close your eyes and make a wish. There — sparkling in the sunshine, whispering on the tips of dandelion seeds, your wishes ride off into the breeze.

Shake this snow globe and watch the tiny silver flecks shimmer and float, mimicking the dandelion’s dance. Wish.

WISH snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs 2015
And wish again.

WISH, one of a kind snow globe with faux dandelion made of vintage beads, fishing line, sparkles, wire and findings. All designs, photographs and images copyright (c) 2015 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Quoth the Raven “Ever More”

I lEver More Raven snow globe by Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado 2015ike ravens. And crows. And red-winged blackbirds, teasing with a flick of color.

And I like Edgar Allen Poe’s famous poem with the haunting phrase, “Quoth the Raven, ‘Never More.’ ”

 

But I also liked the contrast of a mysterious bird bringing life to a restless heart — the flick of color in a dark landscape.

And, because I remain a romantic, the bird dropped just one letter, changing the meaning from Hopeless to Hopeful.

 

Ever More.

 

 

“The Raven” was written in 1845, a mere 170 years ago and is still disected, considered, copied and quoted.
Snow Globe details: hand-sculpted clay bird, embellished with metal details including eyes, beak and claws. Leafless bronze tree branch. The raven holds a single red glass heart in its dark beak. Handpainted round wood base in shades of gray, silver and black, finished with an engraved plate “Ever More.”
All images and designs copyright (c) 2015 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Men At Work

Machines both fascinate and frighten me. Sometimes their impact seems to overwhelm the presence of the very people who created them.
This sparkle snow globe, Men at Work, illustrates that feeling. Just who is in charge, anyway? what are we trying to accomplish?

Men at Work custom snow globe by Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado

When shaken, the scene is bathed in shimmering gold dust … until the dust settles, and the work begins again.

One of a kind snow globe/sparkle water globe with interior assembled sculpture of tiny men, gears, machines and tools. All images and designs copyright (c) 2015 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado.

Deep Thoughts, or “where’d I put that idea?” snow globe

Deep Thoughts snow globe, Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USAI like the idea of Deep Thoughts, so ominous and important. Sitting around solving problems, contemplating the universe, or perhaps, just remembering to pick up milk on the way home.

Sometimes there’s a “deep thought” nibbling at the surface of my mind, something I can’t quite wrap around, something I can’t recall or can’t formulate. And thinking about thinking, which is what it amounts to, led to thinking about sending a crew to go get those important things I want to deliberate, or cogitate. (Is it just me, or do a lot of verbs about thinking sound like they could be parts of a washing machine cycle?)

Wouldn’t it be great if you could hire a cleaning crew to get rid of some embarrassing moment you want to forget, or a hazmat crew to sanitize your darkest secrets, or a cheerful group of elves to climb into recent memories and retrieve the happy ending to the dream you couldn’t quite recollect when your eyes opened?

Dig in, there are plenty of deep thoughts to go around.

 

 

“Deep Thoughts” one of a kind snow globe/waterglobe with sculptured miniature clay head and tiny workers digging deep into one’s mind. All designs and images are copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Remnants of Tesla

Nobody really knows what Nikola Tesla would have been capable of, if he’d somehow had the unlimited resources and scientific support needed to research, test and implement all the off-the-wall ideas bouncing around in his mind. As it is, we only have glimpses of his potential, and the ability to imagine what might have been.

Remnants_of_Tesla snowglobe CamrynForrestDesigns_2014
One of his most visible projects was the tower at Wardenclyffe, located on Long Island, New York, and reported to be the first step toward wireless broadcasting. The tower, under construction in the early 1900s and finished in about 1907, was dismantled in 1917.

Was Tesla ahead of his time? This is how he described his plans for the tower, which was reported to have a 55-ton dome (187 feet tall) made of conductive metals, and “roots” that penetrated nearly 200 feet into the Earth:

“As soon as [the Wardenclyffe facility is] completed, it will be possible for a business man in New York to dictate instructions, and have them instantly appear in type at his office in London or elsewhere. He will be able to call up, from his desk, and talk to any telephone subscriber on the globe, without any change whatever in the existing equipment. An inexpensive instrument, not bigger than a watch, will enable its bearer to hear anywhere, on sea or land, music or song, the speech of a political leader, the address of an eminent man of science, or the sermon of an eloquent clergyman, delivered in some other place, however distant. In the same manner any picture, character, drawing, or print can be transferred from one to another place …” (from “The Future of the Wireless Art,” Wireless Telegraphy and Telephony, 1908.)


It is said that Tesla held initial tests of the Tower in 1903, but just days after these tests, his dream was destroyed when creditors from Westinghouse confiscated his heavier equipment for nonpayment for services rendered. In 1917, the 187-foot tower was destroyed by dynamite explosion as ordered by the U.S. government.

Although often described as a telecommunications tower for wireless transmissions, some researchers and historians claim that there was another, much bigger, plan. “The Wardenclyffe plant was not to be solely used for the transmission of signals across the Atlantic, but more ambitiously, the transmission of electric power to any point on the globe without wires—a dream that Tesla had been constantly working toward for the past ten years. With his tower, he would “wobble” the Earth’s static charge. A successful test of his thesis would indeed be the crowning achievement of the age.”  ( from Wardenclyffe – a forfeited dream by Leland Anderson, 1968.)

Thanks to the help of the website “The Oatmeal” and a kickstarter campaign, building a museum dedicated to Tesla’s work is underway on the site of Tesla’s research laboratory and the original foundation of the tower. While it’s hoped that a replica of the tower will be created, we may not ever know how it was intended to operate, as much of Tesla’s brilliance was kept alive in his own memory and thought processes, and rarely written down.

What we have is an incomplete idea of Tesla’s potential and only a partial understanding of his contributions.

What we really have is, Remnants of Tesla.

 

Remnants of Tesla, one of a kind snow globe sculpture, miniature tower created from repurposed vintage jewelry. When shaken, slivers of bright silver flecks give the appearance of liquid electricity and wireless energy. All images and design copyright (c) 2014 Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado.

Notes:

In August 2012, in collaboration with internet cartoonist Matt Inman (TheOatmeal.com), The Tesla Science Center at Wardenclyffe (TSC) group launched an internet fundraising campaign that ultimately raised $1.37 million and eventually succeeded in purchasing the 16-acre industrial property, including Wardenclyffe and the original tower base.

For more information on the progress of the Tesla Science Center at Wardenclyffe, read this.