Heart of the Redwoods

redwood walk sideHow long does a Redwood tree live?
There are some majestic trees in Muir Woods believed to be more than 700 years old. Their cousins are even older: the oldest coastal redwood is more than 2,500 years old and the oldest giant sequoia is about 3,200 years old.

It doesn’t take much to imagine how it felt to walk into the heart of the redwoods a century ago, or to walk there now; towering trees surround you in a majestic sort of cathedral. Whether you stroll quietly along a path as pine needles muffle your steps, or eat lunch in the shade, or simply enjoy the dappled sunshine streaking here and there between the trunks and branches, know this: Those redwoods are likely to be here long after we are gone.

Since a real redwood would be far too large for a snow globe, these tiny trees are first carved, then molded, then cast into shapes that will hold up in liquid. Will these faux redwoods last a thousand years? We don’t know, but if you are still around then, drop us a line and tell us.
The snow globe/water globe: A tiny dapper couple strolls sweetly  between the towering trees, perhaps a  hundred years ago, but only a moment in time for a tree that may live another thousand years. If trees could blink, they might not even notice the intrusion.
When shaken, the globe glitters with the subtle effect of dappled sunshine through a canopy of branches; wood base with tree-trunk embellishment.
One of a kind snow globe, all images and designs are copyright (c) Camryn Forrest Designs, Denver, Colorado USA.

 

 

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